Find out more about the specific courses that we offer:

To download a PDF version of the course catalog, click here.

LCHS Graduation Requirements

Bible:………………………………… (4) Years (Transfer students: required for each semester enrolled at Linfield)

English:…………………………….. (4) Years

Math:………………………………… (3) Years

Social Studies:…………………………. (3) Years
Grade 10: World History
Grade 11: US History
Grade 12: Government/Economics

Science:……………………………………… (2) Years of Lab Science

Foreign Language:………………… (2) Years of the same language

Fine Arts:……………………………………. (1) Year or (4) Years for Fine Arts Academy

Physical Education:……………….. (2) Years (State requirement)

Health:…………………………………………. (1) Semester (State requirement)

Speech & Debate:………………….. (1) Year

Electives:…………………………………… (1) Year college prep elective & other electives to complete credits

Credit Requirements: 260

Bible Courses

Mission of the Bible Department

To create an environment in which: 1) Students can comprehensively and critically learn about the Bible (Mt. 22:34-40), 2) Students understand clearly what the Gospel is and their need for it (1 John 4:7-10), 3) Students experience a relationship with Jesus and the spiritual family on a deep level (Mark 3: 31-35, John 13:34-35), and 4) Students are equipped to build God’s Kingdom in our world upon graduation (Mt. 28:18-20).

This year, we are introducing a new Bible curriculum developed by Wheaton Academy. All students—9th-12th grades—will be taking the same Bible course: Foundations of Faith. In subsequent years, we will add one or more of the following courses each year:

  • Spiritual Formation
  • Life of Christ
  • Doctrine and Apologetics
  • Christ and Culture
  • Leadership, Evangelism and Discipleship
  • Philosophy and Theology

FOUNDATIONS OF FAITH (BI1020 – 9/10; BI3040) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: None.

This course provides a foundation of faith to guide students toward a more holistic understanding of the Christian belief. Following the footsteps of the gospel of John, students will begin by examining the philosophical framework of reality and faith in the context of a metaphysical understanding of reality, truth, faith, fantasy, belief and worldview. Students will examine the basic beliefs of Christ-centered Theists in comparison and contrast to other major philosophical worldviews. Students will determine the trustworthiness and whether or not it is reasonable to believe that the Bible is the revealed Word of God, the trustworthiness of Genesis and identify through the examination of the Bible specific theological beliefs of a Christ-centered Theist. This course provides a survey of the Bible in its progressive unfolding of the history of redemption against the backdrop of creation and sin.

English Courses

English studies are the foundation of understanding the written word and spoken thought in order for students to become effective communicators and critical thinkers. The English Department seeks to provide students with the opportunities and resources to create, critique, analyze, and evaluate a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts. The goal of all English courses is to help students become discerning readers and thinkers skilled in expressing a variety of ideas and beliefs through the written and spoken word in preparation for academic, professional, and personal pursuits.

ENGLISH 9 (EN10) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: None.

English 9 is a beginning World Literature survey course designed to ensure that students will learn to become critical thinkers, readers and writers with emphasis being given to analytical readings and composition. Ninth grade English primarily focuses on building student skills in the areas of active reading, critical thinking, interpreting, writing, speaking, and listening.  Students read and analyze short stories, novels, poetry, plays, and nonfiction selections.  Writing practice emphasizes different types of the five-paragraph essay and encourages original efforts in poetry and short story.  SAT preparatory vocabulary, Greek and Latin roots, literary terminology, and grammar practice are ongoing throughout the year.  Major texts include, but are not limited to, Fahrenheit 451, Romeo and Juliet, The Odyssey, and The Screwtape Letters. Other types of reading and writing help students find direction for their personal lives as contributing Christian members of the American and global communities.

ENGLISH 10 (EN20) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: English 9.

English 10 is a World Literature survey course designed to ensure that students will learn to become critical thinkers, readers and writers with emphasis being given to analytical readings and composition. Students will be exposed to mature themes found in literary pieces such as Lord of the Flies and Of Mice and Men, as they study the Christian perspective alongside contemporary, secular reflections. Plays such as Antigone and Henry V, develop analytical skills and a world perspective through analysis of characterization, theme, time period, and style. Novels such as One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and Cry, The Beloved Country expand student opportunities to work withliterature from other countries.As well as promoting literary understanding, instructors will provide opportunities for demonstrating student synthesis and competency in the usage of the English language.  Students will become stronger readers and writers of the English language as they practice communicating with others through oral expression and presentations, and through the written form of MLA formatted short and long essays. Compositions range from thematic and literary analysis to research papers that help individuals grow in personal knowledge and ability to defend a position. Other types of reading and writing help students find direction for their personal lives as contributing Christian members of the American and global communities. SAT preparatory vocabulary is ongoing throughout the year.

ENGLISH 11 (EN30) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: English 10.

English 11 is a junior level college preparatory course designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of American literature through the study of authors from the Puritan period in America to the present. Students will also be challenged to improve their writing and research skills and to respond critically to the ideas in literature with an intelligent and organized analysis that remains firmly rooted in Biblical truth. In addition, outside reading assignments of major American novels will be required, such as The Crucible, The Scarlet Letter, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, A Farewell To Arms, and The Great Gatsby. Upon completing the course, students should be able to identify, explain, and apply the major characteristics of each literary movement and historical time period in American literature; demonstrate an ability to think about and challenge ideas and/or themes in written literature; write a focused and organized literary analysis essay; evaluate and integrate appropriate and relevant resources into a cohesive argument; identify as well as incorporate literary terms into their oral and written presentations; and demonstrate an expansion of vocabulary and grammar skills in the context of their own writing. In addition, students will focus on developing college reading and writing skills, including analysis of informational texts, expository essay writing, and application of MLA Style.  Other types of reading and writing help students find direction for their personal lives as contributing Christian members of the American and global communities. SAT preparatory vocabulary is ongoing throughout the year.

AP ENGLISH 11 (EN30AP) 2 Semesters

Advanced Placement English Language & Composition

Prerequisite: English 10 with grade of B or better and consent of instructor.

AP English Language & Composition is a course designed to immerse students in college level work in order to produce skilled readers and writers who are able to critically analyze and evaluate prose in terms of both its style and content. The course specifically aims to prepare students for success on the AP exam, and consequently, the primary focus of the class is on underscoring, challenging, and improving writing skills. In particular, coursework will emphasize the identification of stylistic elements within a piece of rhetoric, the evaluation of arguments, and the integration of relevant resources into well-supported responses. In conjunction with the 11th grade curriculum, students are also provided with an overview of the genres and major writers/works in American literature, including the reading of classic texts such as The Scarlet Letter, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and The Great Gatsby. 

ENGLISH 12 (EN40) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: English 11.

This is a senior level college preparatory course designed to equip students with the specific English writing, reading, thinking, and research skills necessary to succeed in college and the workplace. The course includes reading for interpretation and understanding with an emphasis on British literature from the Anglo-Saxon through the Modern periods, as well as critical analysis of selected non-fiction texts. Students will develop their writing skills through reflective, persuasive, argumentative, and other composition forms. Research papers requiring a clear and focused argument along with the evaluation and integration of primary and secondary sources and application of MLA and APA styles will be emphasized. Students will develop increasing proficiency in grammar and vocabulary skills within the context of their own writing. Literary works studied in this course include (but are not limited to) Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Hamlet, A Tale of Two Cities, Frankenstein, and 1984.

AP ENGLISH 12 (EN4A) 2 Semesters

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition

Prerequisite: English 11 Honors with grade of B or better, English 11 instructor recommendation, and consent of instructor.

AP English Literature and Composition is a certified college-level introductory course to literature and academic writing. This course prepares students with the knowledge and skills they need to successfully complete the AP Literature and Composition exam in May through opportunities to complete practice exams and instruction in exam strategies. Coursework is rigorous and includes: extensive reading and study of selected literary texts with emphasis on British and world literature; study of vocabulary and literary terms; strengthened reading comprehension through analysis and critical evaluation; extended written literary analysis; expository and creative writing; and application of the APA style writing format. In addition, the course includes study of the cultures, history, and philosophies that shaped authors’ works as well as critical analysis theories. The writing component of this course emphasizes extended written literary analysis of a text or theme, evaluation or comparison of two or more works, and literary research requiring a clear and focused argument along with the evaluation and integration of primary and secondary sources. Students taking this course are expected to demonstrate advanced writing skills through coherent analytical essays and research papers requiring defense of a thesis using evidence from primary and secondary sources. Literary works studied in this course include (but are not limited to) Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Hamlet, Jane Eyre, Frankenstein, and Wuthering Heights.

SPEECH and DEBATE (PR30) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: 12th grade standing.

This course focuses on the areas of public speaking, oral interpretation, and debate. There will be a number of required speeches that will aid in personal development and audience exposure. As students develop in each of these areas, their exposure to and growth in verbal communication will help them become more confident in public speaking.

INTERNATIONAL ENGLISH COURSES

The International Student Program at Linfield Christian High School provides students with quality instruction in English language acquisition imperative for success in Linfield’s rigorous college preparatory program. The program is designed to help students improve their English proficiency in academic knowledge and skills in specific subject content areas. In conjunction with daily instruction in English reading, writing, comprehension, and vocabulary skills; the program emphasizes higher level academic language proficiency in critical thinking and analytical reading and writing skills. Small class sizes and individual tutoring foster ready progress in students’ individual language abilities.

ENGLISH 9 Shelter (EN10s) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: English Proficiency Test Placement

This two-semester shelter English course is designed for all international students in grade 9 to establish a foundation of literary knowledge along with the speaking, writing, and analytical skills necessary to excel in further studies. This World Literature survey course is designed to ensure that students will learn to become critical thinkers, readers and writers with emphasis being given to analytical readings and composition. The primarily focuses are on building student skills in the areas of active reading, critical thinking, interpreting, writing, speaking, and listening. Students read and analyze short stories, novels, poetry, plays, and nonfiction selections. Writing practice emphasizes different types of the five-paragraph essay and encourages original efforts in poetry and short story. SAT preparatory vocabulary, Greek and Latin roots, literary terminology, and grammar practice are ongoing throughout the year. Major texts include, but are not limited to, Fahrenheit 451,  Night, Romeo and Juliet, The Odyssey, and To Kill a Mockingbird. Other types of reading and writing help students find direction for their personal lives as contributing Christian members of the American and global communities. Both of these approaches will be used to increase critical thinking, vocabulary, language, writing, and grammar skills. Goals include: inspiring, preparing and connecting all students for college and post-secondary success; providing the skills and knowledge necessary to compete in the 21st century; and encouraging collaboration, to make meaning of any text, and to communicate effectively in speech and writing.

ENGLISH 10 Shelter (EN20s) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: English I Shelter & English Proficiency Test Placement

This two-semester shelter English course is designed for all international students of grade 10 to establish a foundation of literary knowledge along with the speaking, writing, and analytical skills necessary to excel in further studies. This World Literature survey course is designed to ensure that students will learn to become critical thinkers, readers and writers with emphasis being given to analytical readings and composition. Students will be exposed to mature themes found in literary pieces such as Lord of the Flies and Of Mice and Men, as they study the Christian perspective alongside contemporary, secular reflections. Plays such as Antigone and Henry V, develop analytical skills and a world perspective through analysis of characterization, theme, time period, and style. Books such as The Screwtape Letters will expand student opportunities to work with literature from a Christian world view. In addition to promoting literary understanding, instructors will provide opportunities for demonstrating student synthesis and competency in the usage of the English language. Students will become stronger readers and writers of the English language as they practice communicating with others through oral expression and presentations, and through the written form of MLA formatted short and long essays. Compositions range from thematic and literary analysis to research papers that help individuals grow in personal knowledge and ability to defend a position. Other types of reading and writing help students find direction for their personal lives as contributing Christian members of the American and global communities. SAT preparatory vocabulary is ongoing throughout the year. Goals include: inspiring, preparing and connecting all students for college and post-secondary success; providing the skills and knowledge necessary to compete in the 21st century; and encouraging collaboration, to make meaning of any text, and to communicate effectively in speech and writing.

Mathematics Courses

The primary objective of the Mathematics curriculum is to provide every student who graduates from Linfield Christian High School a solid foundation in the mathematics needed for success at the college level. The content of the curriculum (and the requirements that must be met by each student) reflects our goal, as a college-preparatory school, to have all graduating seniors meet or exceed the entrance requirements for the University of California and California State University systems.

ALGEBRA I (MA10) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Math 8 (or Algebra A) with a grade of C or better, and/or Math Placement Exam Qualifying Score.

Algebra 1 is a college preparatory, first year course in algebra. The course objectives are to continue practice with arithmetic skills, to establish fundamental principles of algebra, to build and master skills relating to algebraic manipulations of expressions, and to apply algebra skills to problem solving strategies. Topics include variables, solving equations and inequalities, polynomials, rational expressions, graphing linear equations, systems of linear equations, exponents, radicals, and functions.

GEOMETRY (MA20) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Algebra 1

Geometry is a college preparatory course that uses algebra and logic skills to analyze geometric figures. The course objectives are to apply and reinforce algebra skills; to establish fundamental geometric relationships with a variety of figures; to apply logic and the concept of proofs to understanding geometric relationships and theorems; and to apply geometry skills to problem solving strategies. Topics include basic geometric figures, parallelism, perpendicularity, congruence, similarity, two column proofs, inequalities, area, perimeter, volume, circles, and coordinate geometry.

ALGEBRA II (MA30) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Algebra I.  Geometry recommended.

Algebra II is a college preparatory course which includes the following topics: fractional exponents and radicals; solution of linear equations and inequalities; solution of quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula; solution of polynomial equations; solution of linear equations with two and three variables; use of determinants and matrices; linear, quadratic and polynomial functions and their graphs; introduction to conic sections; sequences and series; exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; solution of systems of quadratic equations in two variables; probability; and an introduction to trigonometry. The course emphasizes critical thinking and problem solving through frequent application of the concepts to real life problems.

PRECALCULUS (MA38) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II (70% or above)

Precalculus is a college preparatory course that covers the following conceptual categories: Functions, Number and Quantity, Algebra and Geometry. The standards assure the implementation of the eight mathematical practices including reasoning abstractly/quantitatively, constructing viable arguments, modeling with mathematics, analyzing the structure of algebraic problems, and persevering in solving them. Problem simulations are explored in multiple representations: algebraic, graphic, and numeric. This content provides rich instruction experiences for students and helps them to succeed beyond high school and compete in the 21st century job market.

HONORS ADVANCED MATH (MA40) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: B or above in Algebra II and Geometry or teacher recommendation.

Honors Advanced Math is a college preparatory course, which includes functions and their graphs; development of trigonometric (trig) functions using the unit circle; graphical characteristics of the trig functions; inverse trig functions; trig identities; use of degree and radian measure; polar coordinates and vectors; problems related to force and navigation; trig form of complex numbers; de Moivre’s Theorem; mathematical induction; analytical treatment of conic sections; rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; parametric equations; characteristics of graphs of functions; and the concept of a limit. The graphing calculator is used extensively and is a requirement of the course. This course is designed to prepare students for Calculus.

STATISTICS (MA35) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II (70% or above)

This course covers the basic principles of descriptive statistics, exploratory data analysis, design of experiments, sampling distributions and estimation, and fitting models to data. Other topics include probability distributions, sampling techniques, binomial distributions, and experimental design. The course also looks extensively at the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical inference. Measuring the probability of an event, interpreting probability, and using probability in decision-making are central themes of this course. Examples of games of chance, business, medicine, policy-making, the natural and social sciences, and sports will be explored. The course will use a strong visual/graphical emphasis, based on the premise that students learn best by “doing.” Use of the computer and the graphing calculator expose students to the power and simplicity of statistical software for data analysis. The graphing calculator, the Texas Instruments (TI-83+), is used extensively as a learning tool and is required for the course. Yet, the emphasis will be on interpretation of results and critical thinking over calculations.

AP CALCULUS AB (MA50) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Precalculus with a grade of A and consent of instructor or Advanced Math Honors with a grade of B or better and/or consent of instructor

Advanced Placement Calculus is a college level course that covers two full semesters of introductory college Calculus (functions, graphs and their limits, as well as both differential and integral calculus). The course objectives and content are established by the College Board and are listed in the Advanced Placement course description booklet. College credit for the course is determined by an examination given at the end of the course. Strict adherence to the content outlined by the College Board is essential for success on the AP exam. The graphing calculator is used extensively and is a requirement of the course. TI – 84+ will be used in demonstrations.

AP CALCULUS BC (MA60) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Calculus AB with grade of B or better and/or consent of instructor.

Advanced Placement Calculus BC is a college level course that covers two full semesters of the second part of Calculus (a review of all of Calculus AB) adding further integration techniques, infinite series, conics, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and vectors. The course objectives and content are established by the College Board and are listed in the Advanced Placement course description booklet. College credit for the course is determined by an examination given at the end of the course. Strict adherence to the content outlined by the College Board is essential for success on the AP exam. The graphing calculator is used extensively and is a requirement of the course. TI – 84+ will be used in demonstrations.

Social Studies Courses

The goals of the Social Studies department of the Linfield Christian School are two-fold. First, the curriculum is designed to guide students in the development and articulation of a biblical worldview. The second goal is to offer a rigorous college curriculum while still allowing for individual learning differences. The Social Studies classes are deigned to acquaint students with an understanding of the basic forces that have shaped each discipline. These goals are accomplished by developing in the student the reading, writing, critical thinking and research skills. In order to meet these goals a variety of teaching methods are utilized including projects, collaborative groups, student-centered activities, analyzing primary source material, artwork and many other learning activities. By mastering these goals the Linfield student will be prepared for success at the college or university level.

WORLD HISTORY (SOC20) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: 10th grade standing.

World History surveys both western and non-western societies from the first river civilizations to the 21st century. Emphasis is given to reading primary source materials, critical thinking exercises, reading and writing skills, student-centered activities, projects, and to the application of the lessons of history. In addition, the Biblical basis of history is presented and interwoven into the course. A major project is required along with historical book review assignments.

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY (SOC2A) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA and consent of instructor. B or above in English I

The study of European history since 1450 introduces students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world of which they live. Without this knowledge, we would lack the context for understanding the development of contemporary institutions; the role of continuity and change in the present-day society and politics; and the evolution of current forms of artistic expressions and intellectual discourse. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of AP European History are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principle themes in modern European history, (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and (c) ability to express historical understanding in writing.

U.S. HISTORY (SOC30) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: 11th grade standing.

This course will provide a survey of U.S. History from the Age of Exploration and Colonization to the present. Emphasis is placed on critical and evaluative thinking skills, student-centered activities, role-playing, writing and reading, interpretation of primary sources and graphs and tables. This course will also examine history from a Biblical perspective. Students will come to realize that God is the “String” that holds the events of history together.

AP U.S. HISTORY (SOC3A) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: 11th grade standing, AP European History with a grade of B or better, or World History with a grade of A or better and consent of instructor.

AP U.S. History is a challenging course that is to be the equivalent of a freshman college course and can earn students college credit. It is a two-semester survey of American History from the Age of Exploration and Colonization to the 1990’s. Strong reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote considerable time to preparation and study, is a must in order to succeed. Emphasis is given to critical and evaluative thinking skills, essay writing, interpretation of documents and graphs and tables, and historiography. Unit one must be completed BEFORE school starts in August. Required assignments will include position papers, DBQ project précis, and other research and/or analytical papers. Students who are enrolled in this course are expected to take the national exam in mid-May.

U.S. GOVERNMENT (SOC40) 1 Semester

Prerequisite: 12th grade standing.

This course is designed to introduce students to a comprehensive study of U.S. Government. It will examine the national government and history of the political system. This course will stimulate students to be informed and aware of local, national and current events. It will also encourage and promote skills that will allow students to make their own decisions on political issues and candidates. The class will be predicated on the principle that God has a plan for mankind, and government is one tool used to fulfill that plan.

AP U.S. GOVERNMENT (SOC4A) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: U.S. History with a grade of A or better, or AP U.S. History with a grade of B or better.

This college-level course will examine the national government and political system of the United States. The course will require a substantial amount of reading and preparation for each class. The objectives of this course far surpass a basic examination of how the U.S. government works. Students will study the organization of government and the processes of the American political system, highlighting policy-making and implementation. The institutions and policies of the U.S. government will be studied in the context of historical transformation, constitutional procedures, and comparative perspectives. This course is designed to prepare students for the AP exam.

ECONOMICS (SOC41) 1 Semester

Prerequisite: U.S. Government.

Economics is a course taught in conjunction with U.S. Government. The study of economics is critical for seniors in that it enables them to develop a multifaceted understanding of the world. Economics is a constant struggle of using limited resources and allocating goods and services to satisfy needs and wants. This course will illustrate how scarcity and choice impact the economic decisions of our world. Knowledge of economic systems and choices will assist students in becoming more informed and responsible citizens.

Science Courses

The primary goal of the Linfield Christian science department is to equip students with a solid foundation in the basic sciences which will allow them to participate successfully in further scientific studies at both an academic and professional level without compromise to their Christian faith. To this end all students will:

1. Understand and implement the scientific method.
2. Safely perform lab procedures and use scientific equipment properly.
3. Properly communicate scientific findings through lab write-ups and presentations.
4. Draw meaning from lectures, films and readings and use this understanding to analyze and synthesize information on tests and labs.
5. Learn to work independently and cooperatively while staying on task in class.
6. Demonstrate mastery of new facts and concepts on tests and labs.
7. Make connections between science and other academic disciplines.

CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS (SC10) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra and concurrent enrollment in Algebra I

Conceptual Physics is a laboratory based course through which students will learn a general sampling of physics topics as they appear in the California State Standards. These include Newtonian Mechanics, Properties of Matter, Heat, Waves, Electricity and Magnetism and an introduction to Nuclear Physics. Conceptual Physics introduces students to the common concepts of physics in a practical and hands-on way, including Newtonian Mechanics, Properties of Matter, Heat, Waves, Electricity and Magnetism and introductory Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Some of the goals of this course include that students will not only be able to solve problems common to physics, but have a conceptual understanding that can be used to solve problems through physical intuition and experience. Further, students will learn laboratory techniques that will prepare them for college level science. Students will also gain an appreciation of the subject and its multiple sub topics.

BIOLOGY (SC20) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Algebra 1.

This course is a study of the many disciplines involved in Biology. Major areas of study include ecology, cytology, genetics and heredity, evolution and creation, microbiology, and the human body. The course is designed to help students come to a better understanding of the nature of God as Creator by examining His creation. Students will investigate living organisms’ similarities and differences and examine scientific methods in an inquiry-based environment through lab experiments, activities, and discussions. Theories of evolution will be presented alongside Creationism. Controversial aspects of current biological work will also be discussed, challenging students to reach their own conclusions. This is an introductory class, intended to inspire and prepare students for further course work in the field of science.

The first of four courses in the Biomedical Science ProgramPrinciples of Biomedical Science—is being offered this year. Please refer to page 46 in the full course catalog for course description and requirements.

HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY (SC45) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: C or better in Biology.

Human Anatomy and Physiology is a study of the structure and function of the human body at the cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels. A survey of each organ system is presented by discussing its anatomy followed by its physiology and pathology. This course is recommended for those who will pursue further education in the biological, medical, and health related sciences as well as for those students who want to learn more about the body God gave them. Some of the body systems covered in this course include: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, endocrine, and lymphatic. Labs, with required dissection of non-human specimens, and other activities will enrich the class throughout the year.

CHEMISTRY (SC30) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Biology.

Co-requisite: Algebra II for students with 10th grade standing.

Chemistry is a study of the matter God used to make our material world, and the changes matter can undergo. The course begins with an introduction to the structure of matter, including atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical formulas, chemical equations and stoichiometry relationships. Later, the course focuses on chemical behavior and energy, and includes thermodynamics equilibrium, acid-base equilibrium, kinetics, oxidation-reduction, and nuclear chemistry.

AP CHEMISTRY (SC3A) 2 Semesters 

Prerequisite: B or better in Chemistry, plus department approval.

Advanced Placement Chemistry parallels university-level general chemistry, while also fulfilling all requirements set forth by College Board. Therefore, students are expected to take the AP Chemistry exam when nearing the completion of the course.

The course covers topics similar to high school general chemistry class, but in greater depth and at a college-level pace. The following lecture topics are covered during the year: chemical foundations underlying chemistry, atomic structure and theory, molecules and ions, nomenclature, stoichiometry, solution stoichiometry, gases, thermochemistry, periodicity, bonding, intermolecular and intramolecular forces, solution properties, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, complex ions, spontaneity, entropy, free energy, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and introductory organic chemistry. Additionally, an online web-based learning program is implemented for homework assignments. Students will need access to a computer and internet for homework assignments.

Laboratory experiments mimic university-level scientific investigations. A minimum of 16 labs are conducted during the year; a minimum of 6 of these labs are guided-inquiry investigations. In lab, students will learn to successfully use and interpret data from the following university instruments: colorimeters, spectrophotometers, pH meters, and other probe ware. Students will also learn to compose university-level laboratory reports using special formatting. Due to the rigor and time requirements of certain investigations, students will be required to attend occasional “Zero Periods” before the start of the first class of the day. In addition, students are required to have a laptop/mobile computer and internet access for lab use.

AP BIOLOGY (SC20A) 2 Semesters 

Prerequisite: B or better in Biology, B in Chemistry and Department approval.

Advanced Placement Biology at Linfield Christian High School is a course designed for students that have a strong interest in the sciences, or desire to pursue a career in science. The AP Biology course is designed to offer students topics that are covered in a freshman Biology course at the university level. Students accepting the challenge of an Advanced Placement course will be required to actively participate in all lectures and laboratory activities that are conducted during the year. Students will also need regular access to a computer and the internet to complete online homework assignments.

To succeed in AP Biology students must be highly motivated to learn. Reading requirements for the course are rigorous and require a daily commitment in order to stay caught up in the class. Exams generally cover 3 – 4 chapters in the text and occur every 2-3 weeks depending on the content being covered and the number of labs that are conducted during the unit. Laboratory activities suggested by the College Board are conducted to give the student a fair representation of a university-level Biology course. In addition to the College Board laboratories, the instructors add activities when they supplement the unit effectively.

AP PHYSICS 1 (SC50) 2 Semesters 

Prerequisite: Geometry and concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or equivalent course

AP Physics 1 is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. The course provides students with enduring understanding to support future advanced course work in the sciences. Through inquiry-based learning, students develop critical thinking and reasoning skills, as defined by the AP Science Practices.

Note: Sophomores who want to take AP Physics 1, in addition to Chemistry, need (1) an A in Algebra II, (2) concurrent enrollment in Precalculus, and (3) to submit a request to the Academic Review Committee for permission to enroll in AP Physics 1 as a Sophomore.

Languages Other Than English Courses

God has given us language and communication to heighten the human experience with both Him as Father and with the fellowship of man. Language and communication are at the heart of the human experience. It is the responsibility of our department to equip its students both linguistically and culturally for successful communication in a pluralistic American society. This goal is achieved by utilizing partial to total immersion-teaching methods, in which students receive, process, recall, analyze, and synthesize in the target language. As a consequence of learning another language and gaining access to its unique means of communication, students are able to broaden the sources of information available to them. As they become more proficient users of their second and subsequent languages, students will expand and deepen their understanding of and exposure to other areas of knowledge.

FRENCH I (FR10) 2 Semesters

Pre-Requisite: None

This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic fundamentals of speaking, reading, writing, listening and understanding the French language and culture. Oral communicative language is stressed using controlled vocabulary in everyday conversations. Francophone culture and language is studied via storyboards, slides, movies, and readings. Art, technology, power point presentations, projects, games, TPR (total physical response) strategies and music are used, as are theatrical skits, to enhance language usage. 100% target language usage is a goal in this course.

SPANISH I (SP10) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: None.

Spanish I is an introduction to the study of the Spanish language and its culture. Equal emphasis is given to aural/oral skills, reading, writing, vocabulary and grammar. This beginning course seeks to give the student the foundation of vocabulary and grammatical structures in order to understand and read basic instructions and short elementary stories, as well as write short paragraphs on familiar topics, and speak about, and ask questions about, elementary themes.

SPANISH II (SP20) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Spanish I with a grade of C or better, or department approval.

A continuation of Spanish I, this course is taught in the target language. Students continue to develop cultural sensitivity while furthering their communication skills. The students work towards developing the ability to understand Spanish spoken at a normal speed and to be able to speak and respond with increased fluency. Compositions and projects are varied and more complex as more vocabulary, grammatical structures and verb conjugations are added to the foundation begun in Spanish 1.

SPANISH III (SP30) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Spanish II with a grade of B- or better, or department approval.

This course, taught entirely in the target language, is intended for the student who desires to seriously pursue the study of the language. Students will build upon the grammar presented in Spanish 1 and 2 by completing their study of all the verb tenses of the language, and will expand their vocabulary to enable them to read popular magazines, newspapers, short stories, classic literature and biographical pieces. Students will also write 150 word compositions and letters, and make oral presentations in a variety of verb tenses on varied topics. Students will learn to understand formal and informal Spanish spoken at normal speed, from textbook exercises, to commercials, songs and music videos from TV and radio. Cultural practices and customs from a variety of countries are studied in depth, from guest speakers, missionaries, texts and realia.

AP SPANISH IV (SP4A) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Spanish III with a grade of B or better and department approval.

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is a rigorous course taught exclusively in Spanish that provides students with the opportunity to study the language and culture of the Spanish speaking world and is approximately equivalent to an upper-intermediate college or university Spanish course. The course recognizes the complex interrelatedness of comprehension and comprehensibility, vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. Students learn language structures in context and use them to convey meaning using the three modes of communication: Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational. The course focuses on the integration of authentic resources including online print, audio, and audiovisual resources, as well as traditional print resources that include literature, essays, and magazine and newspaper articles, and also a combination of visual/print resources such as charts, tables, and graphs, all with the goal of providing a diverse learning experience. Like other AP courses, students receiving a 3 or above (scale 1-5) on the AP exam may receive college credit for this course.

Please note that ASL I is no longer offered.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II (ASL200) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: ASL I.

The intent of this course is to focus on ASL as a means of communication with the deaf and hearing impaired. Through dialogue, vocabulary, grammar, and practical application lessons, students should be able to accomplish an intermediate or advanced proficiency level in both expressive and receptive skills. As part of fulfilling the Great Commission, some students may sense God’s call to the mission field of the deaf—the fourth largest unreached people group in the world.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III (ASL300) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: ASL II with a grade of B or better.

This is a continuation of the study of ASL as a second language. The intent of this course is to focus on ASL as a primary channel of language with the deaf and hearing impaired through the application of linguistic standards. Utilizing basic and intermediate skills and principles acquired in ASL 1 and 2, the student is effectively able to dialogue and express and receive language with a substantially improved level of fluency. A strong focus is placed on syntax, semantics, lexicon, classifiers (all forms), temporal and time aspects, storytelling and situation evaluation, and contrastive structures. Students will deepen their understanding of narrative skills (both formal and informal), and increase their ability to relay information, utilizing cultural rules and norms of the deaf.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE IV HONORS (ASL400) 2 Semesters Prerequisite: ASL III with a grade of B or better, and/or consent of instructor.

The intent of this class is to focus on interpreting ASL at a beginning level. Students completing this course are expected to continue their deaf studies in college and will be seeking work as an interpreter or instructor of ASL to the deaf and/or hearing.  In addition to the regular course of study for level 4, students will complete 40 hours of practicum interpreting for this course. The student will demonstrate an effective use of time for the internal examination and preparation of source language messages prior to execution; exhibit increased accuracy in message production; demonstrate the ability to recognize and produce appropriate linguistic features, including syntax, execution, register, phrasing, fluency, and speaker effect; and interpret simultaneously with attention to the linguistic features learned previously. Students will develop a sound understanding of interpreting, and the cognitive processes associated with proper execution of English to ASL translations and interpretations. Students must have strong language skills in both English and ASL before entering this course. By mastering inter-lingual skills, students gain assurance and an increased linguistic capacity.

Fine Arts

The mission of the Linfield Christian School Fine Arts Department is to bring each student to the realization that we are all created in the image of a creative God who is pleased and honored when we use our gifts well; to that end, providing instruction and application for personal expression and a lifetime of artistic enrichment. Opportunities are provided for participation in performing and visual arts. Students are encouraged to explore drama, musical theater, dance, choral ensembles, instrumental ensembles, worship arts, ASL performance, film making, 2-D and 3-D visual media, graphic design and photography.

For those students interested in the Fine Arts Academy, the Fine Arts Academy is a school within a school offering a graduation track with coursework that emphasizes artistic development in addition to meeting the basic academic requirements for UC admission. Currently, graduation with a Fine Arts Academy diploma requires four years of a fine art.

PRINCIPLES OF ART (AR10) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: None.

High School Beginning Art is full-year course that introduces students to the elements of art and principles of design. Using a variety of media, tools, and artistic styles, students will employ the elements of art to design and build a portfolio of original works that build both technical and creative skills. The major emphasis is art production, but the course will include Biblical application, art history, aesthetics, artistic perception, connections to life, and art terms. Previous experience in art is not necessary. Through lecture and demonstration, students will increase knowledge about and practice handling art media and techniques. Students are expected to participate in class discussions and critiques. Oral and written quizzes will be given to reinforce art terms, lecture and demonstration topics and to evaluate students comprehension.

ADVANCED ART (AR25) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Principles of Art.

High School Advanced Art is full-year course that expands information, ideas, and skills learned in Beginning Art. Using a variety of media, tools, and artistic styles, students will employ the elements of art to design and build a portfolio of original works that build and strengthen their existing technical and creative skills. The major emphasis is art production, but the course will include Biblical application, art history, aesthetics, artistic perception, connections to life, and art terms. Through lecture and demonstration, students will increase knowledge about and practice handling art media and techniques. Students are expected to participate in class discussions and critiques. Oral and written quizzes and tests will be given to reinforce art terms, lecture and demonstration topics and to evaluate students comprehension.

AP STUDIO ART (AR3AP – Drawing, AR4AP – 2-D Design)

2 Semesters

Prerequisite:

Acceptance into the course is subject to successful completion of both Art I (Principles of Art) and Art II (Advanced), or Art I or Introduction to Photography and a review of the student’s portfolio (clearly demonstrating the student’s abilities). Acceptance is solely at the discretion of the instructor.

AP Studio Art is limited to those students who seriously wish to pursue further studies and a career in the fine arts. Unlike previous art classes, this class is student-directed; no specific assignments will be given except those assigned as summer work or when the instructor feels it is necessary to broaden the student’s abilities and breadth portion of the portfolio. This course encourages and expects creative and systematic investigation of formal and conceptual issues in 2-D design or drawing. All students will develop a portfolio that contains three sections: quality, concentration, and breadth [C1]. This course is equivalent to a first-year college art class and all students are expected to challenge themselves to develop mastery in their ideas, skills, and abilities in 2-D design (including photography) or drawing. This course enables students to develop mastery (i.e. quality) in concept, composition, and execution of 2-D design or drawing [C2]. Since the course is taught at the college level, the instructor, the students, and the parents must commit to investing the necessary time and energy needed to successfully complete the course. Due to the demands of the AP Studio Portfolio, homework (maintaining a sketchbook journal) and completing portfolio work outside the classroom and beyond scheduled periods is used throughout the course. Students will be under contract with the instructor to produce a minimum of twelve works for the breadth area and a minimum of twelve works for the concentration area all of which must meet the rigorous standards of quality dictated by the College Board to fulfill the AP Portfolio requirements.

AP STUDIO ART (AR5AP – 3-D Design) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: AP 3-D Design is limited to those students who seriously wish to pursue further studies and a career in the fine arts. Acceptance into the course is subject to successful completion of: 1) Art 1 (Principles of Art) and Art 2 (Advanced Art; or, 2) Art 1 and a review of the student’s portfolio (which clearly demonstrates the student’s abilities in 3-D design); or 3) AP Studio Art—2-D Design or AP Studio Art—Drawing. Acceptance is solely at the discretion of the instructor.

Unlike previous art classes, this class is both teacher- and student-directed; specific assignments will be given as summer work and for the breadth portion of the portfolio. All students will develop a portfolio that contains three sections; quality, concentration, and breadth [C1]. Creative and systematic investigation of formal, structural, and conceptual issues in 3-D design including sculpture, fashion, and other three-dimensional media is encouraged and expected. Since the course is equivalent to a first-year college art class, all students are expected to challenge themselves to develop mastery in their ideas, skills, and abilities in 3-D design. Lectures, demonstrations, and individualized instruction will enable students to develop this mastery (i.e. quality) in concept, composition, and execution [C2]. The instructor, students and parents must commit to investing the necessary time and energy needed to successfully complete the course. Due to the demands of the AP Studio Portfolio, homework (maintaining a sketchbook journal) and completing the portfolio work outside the classroom and beyond scheduled class periods is mandatory. Students will be under contract to produce a minimum of twenty-two (22) portfolio pieces (five quality, nine to twelve concentration, and eight breadth) plus the three summer pieces all of which must meet the rigorous standards of quality dictated by the College Board to fulfill the AP Portfolio requirements.

PHOTOGRAPHY (AR15) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Principles of Art

Photography is a full year course designed to help students produce expressive and meaningful photographs and developing creative independence through the exploration of both the techniques and the aesthetics of black and white photography. Throughout the course students will use a variety of subjects, styles and techniques as a means of personal, artistic expression. The major emphasis is to provide a basic foundation of art through student exploration, hands on projects, and the study of historical photographs and photographers. Through lecture and demonstration, students will increase knowledge about and practice handling photograph materials and equipment. Students are expected to participate in class discussions and critiques. Oral quizzes will be given to reinforce art terms, lecture and demonstration topics and to evaluate students comprehension.

THEATER I (DR10) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: None.

Students in Theater I begin to explore the history of the theater. Ancient Greek, Roman, Indian and Asian Theater are introduced with some reading and interpretation. Shakespeare is introduced as well with practice of interpretation and performance. Basic elements of characterization are stressed along with stage placement and movement. Monologues, scene study, improvisational work and one-act plays are all part of the exploration of the Theater I student. They will be asked to read and interpret some 2 and 3 act plays and given the opportunity to perform on stage in a musical; which is part of their final project.

ADVANCED THEATER (DR20) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Theater I and consent of instructor.

This course is designed to continue the instruction put in place in the Drama 1 class and to allow those students interested in theatrical production an avenue to continue their study. Students continue to study the fundamentals of acting, with an emphasis on improvisation, and the presentation of scenes from selected plays. They hone their performance skills and participate in technical support or performance roles for school productions. The course also pro-vides an introduction to text analysis, blocking, mapping dramatic action, and other fundamental tasks of the director. The advanced theater student will build a portfolio of work throughout the class. Their final projects will be showcased at the end of the Semester. This class is also required to perform in the final musical of the year as part of the final assignment.

HONORS ADVANCED THEATER (DR20H) 2 Semesters

Pre-Requisite: Theater I, Advanced Theatre or audition. All honors students must be interviewed and approved by instructor.

In-depth study of theatre, acting theory, theatre history, directing, and reader theatre will be emphasized. Specific stylistic periods of theatre will be addressed, as well as specific scene study techniques in improv, comedy and drama. Students will participate in live productions, as well as exploring the technical aspects of storyboarding, scriptwriting, editing, etc. Students will also write an original script, participate in two productions a year, and attend one production outside of school with written review

FILM APPRECIATION (DR50) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: None.

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to learn to look at and appreciate film/video and the media of this age in a different way. It is also designed to encourage students to critically think from a Christian point of view about the themes, content, principles, and characters within film throughout history and in its different genres. Students will view film throughout its brief history and examine the work of selected filmmakers and the different genres encompassed in film. In groups of 4-5, they will produce 3-6 minute videos dealing with different topics and genres. The goal of this class is for each student to walk away with a new appreciation for film as an art form and a powerful media influence within our culture and to have had a great time studying the media and determining how it applies to our lives.

INTERMEDIATE MEDIA PRODUCTION (DR60) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Film Appreciation

This course is designed to let students further their opportunities in film/video production based on the precepts and principles learned in the Film Appreciation course. Students will explore the media for creative content, working individually and in groups to produce various media projects. Students will explore all aspects of film/video production, including: planning, scripting, pre-production, production, lighting, sound, cinematography, editing, and post-production. Students will be shown a deeper meaning of the aesthetic and ethical elements of cinema. Students will critically examine why filmmakers create media the way they do.

MEDIA PRODUCTION (DR70) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Intermediate Media Production (DR60).

This course is designed to let students get hands on opportunities in Media based on the precepts and principles learned in the Film Production course. Students will explore the media for creative content, working individually and in groups to produce various media projects. Students will create all aspects of production, including: planning, scripting, pre-production, production, lighting, sound, cinematography, editing, and post-production. Students will be filming morning announcements as well as different events throughout the school year.

WIND ENSEMBLE (MU20)  2 Semesters

Prerequisite: None.

The Linfield Christian High School Concert Band is a one-year college preparatory course with an emphasis on sight-reading; literature preparation for festival and concert performances; and development of aesthetic and cultural values through comprehensive musicianship, including formula analysis, music theory, historical background, and stylistic interpretation. This course is open to any 9th-12th grade student who desires to develop musical skills for individual and ensemble playing of wind instruments and percussion.

HONORS WIND ENSEMBLE (MU20H)  2 Semesters

Pre-Requisite: At least two years in Wind Ensemble and audition with Director; must have completed Alfred’s Essentials of Music Theory levels 1-3 or the equivalent

Wind Ensemble Honors is open to selected wind and percussion students of superior ability by audition only.  This is the highest level wind ensemble course offered and is preceded by at least two years in the regular Wind Ensemble. This course includes advanced wind ensemble literature. Students will be required to participate in a solo/ensemble festival or audition for an association/state honor group.

Wind Ensemble Honors is designed to refine students’ advanced music skills in the Wind Ensemble setting.  Through an increased expectation of focus and rigor, students will strive toward musical excellence, preparing them to pursue music at the collegiate and professional level.  Major goals and outcomes will include encouraging musical responsiveness, enhancing creative expression and providing a sound basis of musical experience.  These experiences will then be used in learning to make judgments about musical value.  Students will additionally develop discipline, and perseverance while attaining advanced proficiency on an instrument.  This course will provide opportunities for students to develop and understand the role and development of music and composition through a historical and cultural context.  Finally, students will be expected to connect and apply what is learned in music to learning in other art forms, subject areas and careers.  The entire course outline will be supported by performance and rehearsal techniques, sectionals, private lessons, lecture, video and audio.

JAZZ ENSEMBLE (MU25)  2 Semesters

Pre-Requisite: None

Co-Requisite: Wind Ensemble or Honors Wind Ensemble

This elective course is designed to develop an understanding of the nature, structure and meaning of the jazz idiom through the rehearsal and performance of advanced jazz literature. This course provides for increasing skill in jazz ensemble performance. This course may be repeated for credit. This year, the course will meet at night on Mon 6-9pm (Tues, if no school on Mon) and Thur 2:35-3:15pm.

Physical Education & Other Required Courses

BOYS/GIRLS (PE10) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: 9th grade standing.

This course provides exposure to a variety of individual and team sports with an emphasis on higher level skills and strategy. Lecture units on nutrition, fitness, muscular-skeletal anatomy, and cardio-respiration offer enhancement to Health curriculum. Students’ level of fitness is measured regularly in accordance with state and national testing programs. Curriculum intends to develop understanding of and appreciation for lifelong fitness and healthful living.

HEALTH (PE30) 1 Semester

Prerequisite: None. Open to grades 9-12, but usually taken in 9th grade (online only).

This course will provide instruction on the most recent health information available. By learning the facts about various issues, the student will have a basis on which to make their own health choices. Health is taught online in a 9 week program.

Electives

ACADEMIC SEMINAR (AS20) 2 Semesters

Pre-Requisite: None

This course is designed to provide a gateway to academic success for all 9th grade and new international students at Linfield, through specially designed academic instructions of English. Students who attend this class will obtain need-specific support to improve their English proficiency in academic knowledge and skills in specific subject content areas. The course uses a workshop approach through which students will have a unique opportunity to work one-to-one with an instructor and other students in small groups on reading and writing assignments from all courses in which students are enrolled (English, Social Studies, Science, etc.). Students further develop study skills, general test-taking strategies, and proficiency in English reading, writing, comprehension, grammar, and vocabulary skills that will help them to be successful in upper-level and AP courses. In addition, the course offers SAT and ACT exam preparation through vocabulary development, as well as reading comprehension and testing strategies.

YEARBOOK (PR20) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: Application and consent of instructor.

This class produces the High School yearbook. Students learn and use skills connected with publishing, photography, journalism, interviewing, technology, and public relations.

INTERNSHIP (INHS) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: 10th -12th grade standing, or 9th grade standing with consent of counselor.

This course is designed for students to assist Linfield Faculty and Staff members. Students will be directed by the appointed Faculty/Staff member and will work on numerous classroom related activities. The intern will receive a grade from the Faculty/Staff member for their attendance, accountability and a self-evaluation essay. The student will receive five credit points for each semester.

Engineering

Linfield Christian School’s Engineering Program is designed for high school students who are interested in exploring a career in one of the various fields of engineering and is part of our K-12 STEAM initiative. The program seeks to give students a solid foundation in engineering design and strategies for solving real world problems. The Engineering Program is aligned with Linfield’s mission to train up professionals to serve the Lord and the world through their leadership and character.

Our program centers around applying engineering, science, math, and technology to solve complex, open-ended problems in a real-world context. Students focus on the process of defining and solving a problem, not on getting the “right” answer. They learn how to apply STEAM knowledge, skills, and habits of mind to make the world a better place through innovation. Even for students who do not plan to pursue engineering after high school, the Linfield’s Engineering program provides opportunities to develop highly transferable skills in collaboration, communication, and critical thinking, which are relevant for any coursework or career.

The Engineering Program consists of TWO primary components:

(1) A sequence of four or five classes by Project Lead the Way (PLTW) culminating in a capstone course:

2 Core Engineering Classes (Usually taken during Freshman/Sophomore years)

Intro to Engineering Design (IED) (Currently Offered)

Principles of Engineering (POE) (Currently Offered)

3 Field Specific Classes (Students will pick one or two of these for Jr/Sr Years)

Computer Science Principles (CSP) (Currently Offered)**

Civil Engineering and Architecture (2017-18)

Digital Electronics (2018-19)

1 Capstone Course

Engineering Design and Development (EDD) (2018-19) – In this course the student will spend the year researching, designing and testing a project of their own design in coordination with mentors from the engineering community culminating in a presentation to the engineering community.

(2) A career pathway that includes specific requirements for student registration and course work, mentoring and support by Linfield teachers and engineering professionals, and participation in internships, as well as a variety of engineering events and activities (field trips, lecture series, honor societies, community service, shadowing, hands-on use of equipment, etc.). The career pathway is a larger commitment of time, with parts of it requiring after school work, some weekend events and an investment of time over the summer.

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN (TE20) 2 Semesters

Pre-Requisite: Algebra I, concurrent enrollment in Geometry

The ability to use technology effectively is crucial to success in the colleges and careers of the 21st century. In this class, you’ll develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes you need to use technology at school, work, and in your everyday life. Topics you’ll learn about include: keyboarding, Internet browsing and research, Google Apps, Microsoft Office, MLA formatting, and digital citizenship topics. This course is aligned to the National Education Technology Standards for Students.

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING (TE30) 2 Semesters

Pre-Requisite: Introduction to Engineering Design, Geometry

Through problems that engage and challenge, students explore a broad range of engineering topics, including mechanisms, the strength of structures and materials, and automation. Students develop skills in problem solving, research, and design while learning strategies for design process documentation, collaboration, and presentation.

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (TE40) 2 Semesters

Pre-Requisite: Algebra I with B or better, department approval

Using Python® as a primary tool and incorporating multiple platforms and languages for computation, this course aims to develop computational thinking, generate excitement about career paths that utilize computing, and introduce professional tools that foster creativity and collaboration. CSP helps students develop programming expertise and explore the workings of the Internet. Projects and problems include app development, visualization of data, cybersecurity, and simulation. The course curriculum is a College Board-approved implementation of AP CS Principles. Students who take this course may choose to take the AP course in May. However, this course does not qualify as an AP course with associated boost in grade point.

Biomedical Science

Linfield Christian School’s Biomedical Sciences Program is designed for high school students who are interested in exploring a career in the medical field and was developed in part as a response to a chronic need in Riverside County for qualified health care professionals. The program exposes students to the ever expanding branches of the medical profession, enables them to seek further education in a field about which they are passionate, and affords them opportunities to model practices of the healthcare profession under direct mentorship and instruction of experienced health care professionals. The Biomedical Sciences Program is aligned with Linfield’s mission to train future health care professionals to serve the Lord and the world through their character and leadership.

The Biomedical Sciences Program consists of TWO primary components:

(1) A sequence of four courses by Project Lead the Way (PLTW) culminating in a capstone course:

— Principles of Biomedical Science (PBS) – 2016-17

— Human Body Systems (HBS) – 2017-18

— Medical Interventions (MI) – 2018-19

— Biomedical Innovation (BI, capstone course) – 2019-2020

One new course will be introduced every year in the sequence indicated above. Students who start the program in 2016-17 will be able to graduate in 2019-20 with all four courses on their high school transcript. Students progress through the four-year sequence of courses together as a cohort. All four courses are characterized by hands-on, real-world, collaborative group learning experiences. Courses are successive, progressing in content, skill, complexity and innovation requirements. All are approved by the University of California.

(2) A career pathway that includes specific requirements for student registration and course work, mentoring and support by Linfield teachers and community healthcare professionals, and participation in internships, as well as a variety of health care events and activities (field trips, lecture series, science and medical societies, community service, internships, shadowing, hands-on use of medical equipment, etc.).

The first of the four-course sequence by Project Lead the Way (PLTW)—Principles of Biomedical Science—is being offered this year.

PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE (BM10) 2 Semesters

Pre-Requisite: Algebra I; concurrent enrollment in Geometry

In this introductory course of the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Biomedical Science program, students explore concepts of biology and medicine to determine factors that led to the death of a fictional person. While investigating the case, students examine autopsy reports, investigate medical history, and explore medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, basic biology, medicine, and research processes while allowing them to design their own experiments to solve problems.

SPORTS MEDICINE (PR45) 2 Semesters

Prerequisite: C or better in Biology I or teacher approval.

Sports Medicine will teach students the essential building blocks of human anatomy and physiology needed for future education in the medical field. Sports injuries and their treatment will be introduced to relate human anatomy (structure of the body) with human physiology (function of the body). Students will be introduced to critical thinking processes used to understand the physiology of the human body. An after-school

Sports Medicine club will be offered to students who wish to extend their knowledge of the course. This supplemental course will include lab activities only and will require knowledge from class lectures. This is strongly recommended for students pursuing a future in the medical field.

Online Courses

Linfield Christian High School is committed to promoting 21st Century skills for students as they integrate academic content. The use of online learning is twofold at Linfield: 1) enrichment for students who have completed their minimum core academic requirements; and 2) remediation for students who have not met the minimum admissions requirements for the California public university systems. These courses are offered above and beyond the Linfield curriculum for a cost of $475 per semester course.

Linfield Christian High School has developed partnerships with two online educational institutions—Orange Lutheran Online and Florida Virtual School—which serve as the educational providers for our students taking online classes. It is important that students and parents consider the following factors when deciding to take an online class:

  • The online class environment is predominantly independent learning and will require students to be self-motivated and mature as they will be responsible for their learning.
  • While the format of the online classes is non-traditional and flexible, students should expect to be challenged and have nightly and/or weekly homework, tests, projects, or papers. Students must be disciplined to follow the designed scope and sequence of the course in order to be successful.
  • Each partnering institution has policies and procedures for the completion of online work, grading, tests, late work, and other educational practices and do not necessarily follow the same policies and procedures as Linfield Christian High School. Therefore, parents and students need to understand and agree to follow the institutions’ designed curriculum and policies.
  • While Linfield Christian High School will facilitate enrollment into these courses and recognize this coursework on a student’s transcript, the student and parents will primarily be dealing with the online instructor and partnering institution. It is critical to understand the expectations for communication and also realize that online education is different from a traditional classroom experience. The majority of communication will occur electronically, so students and parents need to understand and follow the procedures designed by the partnering institution to insure success. Wherever possible, we are committed to providing online courses taught by Linfield faculty. At the moment, three online courses are taught by Linfield faculty: (1) Health – Joanna Ricketts, (2) World History – Ryan McKenzie, and (3) World History Honors – Ryan McKenzie.

In cases where students have a full schedule and need to take an 8th course in order to accommodate a specialized area of interest (Fine Arts, Engineering, Biomed), students may take an 8th course online. Courses which can be taken online for this purpose include Health, World History, World History Honors. For additional information, please contact the College Counseling Office.

Remediation Online Courses:
Math: Geometry, Algebra I, Algebra II
Science (may require travel 2-3 times for labs): Biology, Chemistry
History: World History, Honors World History, U.S. History, AP U.S. History, Government & Economics, AP Government
English: English I, II, III, and IV, AP Language, AP Literature
Language Other Than English: Spanish I, Spanish II
Health/PE – required as an online option

Enrichment Online Courses:
Electives: Art History and Criticism, Careers in Criminal Justice, College and Career Readiness, Creative Photography, Critical Thinking and Study Skills, Dave Ramsey’s Foundations in Personal Finance High School Edition, Digital Information Technology, Forensic Science, Foundations of Programming, Foundations of Web Design, Journalism, Law Studies, and Leadership Skills Development

Advanced Placement: AP Art History, AP Macroeconomics, AP Microeconomics, AP Psychology, AP Human Geography, AP Computer Science, AP Environmental Science, AP Statistics

Linfield Christian School is pleased to announce the addition of eight online AP courses to its high school curriculum. These classes are offered as an eighth class and therefore are an additional cost of $475 per semester.

The following AP courses will be available:
o AP Computer Science A & B (two semesters)
o AP Macro Economics (one semester)
o AP Micro Economics (one semester )
o AP Psychology (two semesters)
o AP Environmental Science (two semesters)
o AP Art History (two semesters)
o AP Statistics (two semesters)
o AP Human Geography (two semesters)

Contact Desirae Jesse, Online Education Coordinator, for more information: djesse@linfield.com

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE A 
Course #: Adv Pl Computer Science A
Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Semesters: 2
Graduation Credit: Elective
UC Approval: Yes, “g” course – College preparatory elective
Cost: $475 per semester, plus AP exam fee (AP exam is optional for online AP courses)
Pre-Requisite: Algebra I and II

The AP Computer Science A course is equivalent to the first semester of a college level computer science course.  The AP Computer Science A course is an introductory course in computer science. Because the design and implementation of computer programs to solve problems involve skills that are fundamental to the study of computer science, a large part of the course is built around the development of computer programs that correctly solve a given problem. These programs should be understandable, adaptable, and, when appropriate, reusable. At the same time, the design and implementation of computer programs is used as a context for introducing other important aspects of computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, the study of standard algorithms and typical applications, and the use of logic and formal methods. In addition, the responsible use of these systems is an integral part of the course.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT MACROECONOMICS
Course #: Adv Pl Macroeconomics
Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Semesters: 1
Graduation Credit: ½ credit – Elective
UC Approval: Yes, “g” course – College preparatory elective
Cost: $475 per semester, plus AP exam fee (AP exam is optional for online AP courses)
Pre-Requisite: None

The purpose of the AP course in macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Topics include: basic economic concepts, measurement of economic performance, national income and price determination, financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and open economy.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT MICROECONOMICS
Course #: Adv Pl Microeconomics
Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Semesters: 1
Graduation Credit: ½ credit – Elective
UC Approval: Yes, “g” course – College preparatory elective
Cost: $475 per semester, plus AP exam fee (AP exam is optional for online AP courses)
Pre-Requisite: None

The purpose of the AP course in microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Topics include: basic economic concepts, the nature and functions of product markets, factor markets, and market failure and the role of government.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOLOGY
Course #: Adv Pl Psychology
Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Semesters: 2
Graduation Credit: 1 credit – Elective
UC Approval: Yes, “g” course – College preparatory elective
Cost: $475 per semester, plus AP exam fee (AP exam is optional for online AP courses)
Pre-Requisite: None AP

AP Psychology is a college-level course providing students an overview of the development of human behaviors and thoughts. Along with preparation for the AP Psychology exam, the goals of this course are to immerse students in modern psychological investigation techniques, to accentuate the ethics and morality of human and animal research, and to emphasize scientific critical thinking skills in application to the social sciences. Psychology is a diverse social and biological science with multiple perspectives and interpretations. The primary emphasis of this course is to help students develop an understanding of concepts rather than memorize terms and technical details; the ultimate goal is to prepare students to successfully take the AP Psychology examination offered in May.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Semesters: 2
Graduation Credit: Science
Fees: $475 per semester, plus $92 AP exam fee
UC Approval: Yes, “d” course – College preparatory elective
Pre-Requisite: Algebra I and two years of high-school science, with labs

The AP Environmental Science course explores the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. Students evaluate the risks associated with environmental problems and examine alternative solutions in virtual labs. This course meets one required science credit for high school graduation. The ultimate goal is to prepare students to successfully take the AP Environmental Science examination offered in May.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ART HISTORY
Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Semesters: 2
Graduation Credit: Elective
Fees: $475 per semester, plus $92 AP exam fee
UC Approval: Yes, “g” course – College preparatory elective
Pre-Requisite: Sophomore status. Concurrent enrollment in—or completion of—World History, Honors World History, or AP European History recommended

The AP Art History course explores such topics as the nature of art, its uses, its meanings, art making, and responses to art. Through investigation of diverse artistic traditions of cultures from prehistory to the present, the course fosters in-depth and holistic understanding of the history of art from a global perspective. Students learn and apply skills of visual, contextual, and comparative analysis to engage with a variety of art forms, constructing understanding of individual works and interconnections of art-making processes and products throughout history. AP Art History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university art history survey course; the ultimate goal is to prepare students to successfully take the AP Art History examination offered in May.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS
Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Semesters: 2
Graduation Credit: Math
Fees: $475 per semester, plus $92 AP exam fee
UC Approval: Yes, “c” course – College preparatory elective
Pre-Requisite: Algebra II

AP Statistics enables students to actively construct understanding of the methods, interpretation, communication, and application of statistics. Each unit is framed by ideas and questions designed to provide students with a deep understanding of the concepts at hand, rather than memorization and emulation. This course meets one required math credit for high school graduation; the ultimate goal is to prepare students to successfully take the AP Statistics examination offered in May.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Semesters: 2
Graduation Credit: Elective
Fees: $475 per semester, plus $92 AP exam fee
UC Approval: Yes, “g” course – College preparatory elective
Pre-Requisite: Strong reading and writing skills are recommended.

In AP Human Geography, students explore the patterns and processes that impact the way humans understand, use, and change Earth’s surface. Geographic models, methods, and tools help students examine the effect that human social organization and interconnections have on our world. The ultimate goal is to prepare students to successfully take the AP Human Geography examination offered in May.